Home » Rules of Order for Societies, Conventions, Church Councils, Corporations, Town Meetings, County Boards, City Councils, and Legislative Bodies by Charles Martin Scanlan
Rules of Order for Societies, Conventions, Church Councils, Corporations, Town Meetings, County Boards, City Councils, and Legislative Bodies Charles Martin Scanlan

Rules of Order for Societies, Conventions, Church Councils, Corporations, Town Meetings, County Boards, City Councils, and Legislative Bodies

Charles Martin Scanlan

Published
ISBN : 9781230371740
Paperback
40 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1911 edition. Excerpt: ... form of address l65MoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1911 edition. Excerpt: ... form of address l65 open debate on the plea that he intends to make a motion- but he may state why he makes the motion, if there is something unusual about it or that he makes the motion on request. Debate cannot precede the putting of a question. The presiding officer should recognize alternately those for and against the question, and extend the courtesy of the preference to a new member. Everything else being equal, he should recognize the most distant as frequently as the nearest, and the young as often as the old. A member always addresses the Chair as Mr. President (or Madam President), or in the form required by the special rule of the society, and not Ladies and Gentlemen, nor Fellow Citizens, nor Brethren, etc. Reading a speech or papers without leave is prohibited in debate.2 Also, it is not allowable to mention a members name, or to refer to him in the second person, or impugn his motives, or to use personalities in debate- but when reference to 2. 7 Hinds, 665. 6 Hinds, 60i. 8 Hinds, S3, dishing, Sec 1532. 106 inquiry, disorder another member is necessary, he must be described as The gentleman who last spoke, the delegate from Buncombe County, or The member on my left.3 If a member desires to ask another a question, he must obtain leave to do so through the Chair, by rising and saying, Mr. President, I desire to ask the gentleman a question. The President may say, If the gentleman has no objection, you may do so. The speaker may respectfully decline to answer any question, or may answer the question as a courtesy. When a member rises to ask a question he must ask his question in terse language and then sit down. He cannot discuss his question. The question that he asks the speaker must be relevant to the...